Kinky Sex Has Some Surprising Benefits

Listen to what the experts have to say first: It’s possible that having sex with a kink in your underwear will make you feel better and improve your mental health. Studies show that BDSM has both dominant and submissive adherents.

  • less agitated
  • a lot more outgoing
  • more receptive to new things

becoming more responsible while also becoming less sensitive to rejection

In addition, they felt better about themselves than people in the control group did. People with these characteristics may find kinky sex attractive, or kinky sex may help them grow and gain confidence. As research into the effects of kinky sex continues, however, the latter possibility becomes more and more likely.

When couples engage in consensual sadomasochism (SM), their levels of the stress hormone cortisol drop, and they report feeling more connected and intimate after their sexual play, according to a 2009 study by Trusted Source.

Preliminary research has shown that BDSM can reduce anxiety by putting the mind into a different “flow” state of consciousness in people who take on roles they’re not used to, such as doms who switch roles with subs. People who go on a “runner’s high,” do art projects, or practise yoga may experience something similar to this.

Knowledge is power, especially when it comes to dispelling common misconceptions.

There are many myths and misconceptions about kinky sex because we don’t talk about it. Let’s dispel a few myths about kink culture.

Women, too, are drawn to kink.

For example, while more men are interested in foot fetish play and more women are interested in feeling pain during a sexual encounter, both men and women are interested in exploring kink on an equal basis.

Trying BDSM isn’t “crazy,” you know.

The BDSM is frequently linked to abuse and violence in popular culture. Practitioners of kink have even been persecuted or discriminated against. However, research indicates that the average person who partakes in consensual kink is in better psychological health than the average person.

You don’t require a lot of glitzy gear.

When you hear the term “kinky sex,” images of a leather-clad dominatrix with a matching whip may come to mind. However, all you really need is a little creativity and a willing partner.

If you’re into certain fetishes or just want to learn more about the world, you’ll find shops that cater to your needs. However, trying kink requires a lot less equipment than, say, joining a local recreational ice hockey league for a few hours each week. If you want to play around with sensory deprivation or restraints, you don’t even need blindfolds or handcuffs; a tie or pillowcase will do.

ensuring that children’s bedroom play is both enjoyable and safe

If you’re interested in learning more about the benefits of kinky sex, there are a few considerations you should keep in mind so that your explorations are positive, safe, and fun.

Consent is the first step in everything.

Informed consent should be given before any sex act, not just those involving a new partner. This is especially true if you’re trying something new and kinky. Healthy sexual relationships require open communication, but it’s even more critical when you’re experimenting with dominant/submissive roles or causing harm.

There is no laughing matter when it comes to the use of protective language

Restraints or resistance may be a part of your fantasies, which is more common in women than you think. It is important to have a way to say no in your fantasy world, but also clearly to your partner, before you get kinky, use an agreed-upon safe word. Red light (go slow) and green light (go forward) are the most common default phrases (keep going).

Prepare yourself by thinking about (and discussing) your “hard limits.”

Each person has their own set of limitations and guidelines. It’s great to be open to new bedroom activities, but it’s equally important to be open about what you don’t want to explore. Talk openly with your partner about these “hard limits” — there’s no need to be secretive about it.

Ensure that the pain you’re experiencing is enjoyable and has no negative effects on your health.

Kinky sex is all about combining pleasure and pain. If you’re interested in exploring other options, such as breast and genital pain, you should educate yourself so that you don’t cause long-term or serious damage to tissue or nerves. Many couples draw the line at light spanking and/or slapping.

Aftercare is just as crucial as the initial treatment.

Postcoital dysphoraTrusted Source includes symptoms like anxiety, irritability, or motiveless crying, even when women don’t engage in “kinky sex.” For those with BDSM, it’s especially critical to provide aftercare that includes emotional intimacy and communication.

Avoid going to bed immediately following a long and intense sex session. Make a point of checking in with your partner to see how they’re feeling about what just happened.

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